Swamp Things and Singing True: a Review of the comic Bayou

If you’re going to build a world with words, look at Jeremy Love’s comic book series Bayou for inspiration—you can’t go wrong. What began as a web comic is now printed in two beautiful volumes that you need to read. Southern swamps have never looked so beautiful. I have to warn you though, Bayou is not…

Fairy Tales and Flesh Eaters: A Closer Look At Rosamund Hodge’s Crimson Bound

 “I don’t recall hearing that any of the damned were content.” “They’re content to stay in their sins.” Young adult fiction is one genre that falls prey to the nonstop conveyor belt of the publishing industry—an industry which has arguably grown more focused on churning out books that sell rather than selecting books with “quality”…

Grad School or Dragons? Thoughts on Why We Love Speculative Fiction

There is something about lovers of speculative fiction that is different from the lovers of strictly garden-variety fiction. You cannot compare the passions of a Potterhead and a Hemingway fan—the fact that “Hemingwayhead” is not a term is a testament to this. I love Jane Austen, but I “Oh my God, I would die to…

Baba Yaga and the Allure of the Wicked in Russian Folklore

If you are at all familiar with Russian fairy tales, you are familiar with Baba Yaga. Her appearance is nightmarish: a long crooked nose that touches the ceiling when she sleeps on the pechka,  iron teeth perfect for biting through human flesh, and a “boney leg” supposedly gleaned from a human boy. Her preferred method…

The First of Many Nights

This past TCAF (Toronto Comics Art Festival) I was wandering the webcomic floor when I stumbled upon a  treasure trove: a beautifully drawn, full-colour comic that retells a very old story—or rather, retells a series of stories. 1001 is a comic book re-imagining of the 1001 Arabian Nights. For those who do not know, the…